Tips for Dealing with Clients Who Are Going Through a Divorce

I stand for families to be well, whether together or separated.

In our professional life we encounter clients who are either thinking of separating or who are definitely separating. People in the service industry rely on good relationships with their clients and word of mouth to sustain and grow their business. It is my view, which I know is not shared by all, that to foster a good relationship with clients we ought to invest ourselves in our clients’ lives. This means not only delivering our services with integrity, but also paying attention to what is going on in their lives and making appropriate referrals to adjunct services as needed.

Here are some tips on dealing with families that are separating from 3 different points in time.

1.       Clients who are at crossroads and are unsure about separating

  • Encourage clients to take their time in making such an important decision.

>If they are reacting impulsively over a recent argument, they may not have thought through all of the implications of breaking up a family.

  • Ask clients if they would like you to make referrals to professionals.

>That includes: companies offering neuroplasticity-based products[1], more traditional services such as counselling, speaking to elders or religious leaders.

  • Ask clients if they are ready to get legal information from a lawyer.

>Many clients are not ready for this step as it solidifies a step towards a separation, but for others, getting questions answered may alleviate stress and anxiety about the future. If they are ready, refer them to lawyers that are trained in Collaborative Law, because they would be more likely to hear about all of their options not just going to court.

2.       Clients who are ready to separate but don’t yet have a lawyer 

  • Ask clients if they would like you to make a referral to a few lawyers.

>If the answer is yes, then be sure to give the client the website for Collaborative lawyers which is www.oclf.ca/index.htm. Or get acquainted with Collaborative law lawyers and use their names to make referrals.

  • Ask client if they need other support during the legal separation process.

>Such services include companies offering neuroplasticity-based products[2], more traditional services such as counselling, speaking to elders or religious leaders, financial advisors, divorce coaches, parenting plan experts.

3.       Clients who are already involved in the separation or divorce process 

  • If the client experiences doubt about his or her lawyer and the process they are in, suggest they meet with another lawyer to see if that lawyer would be a better fit.

>There are risks involved in this tip, including the added cost for transferring a file. But if the client/lawyer relationship is not good, a change may alleviate stress and anxiety for the client.

  • Ask client if they need other support during the legal separation process.

>Such services include companies offering neuroplasticity-based products[3], more traditional services such as counselling, speaking to elders or religious leaders, financial advisors, divorce coaches, parenting plan experts.

In my experience, clients greatly appreciate and benefit from referrals to other professionals as they see that we have an interest in their well being.


[1] Neuroplasitcity is the ability of the brain to change and adapt. NEXT ltd.com is the only known company, and it is located in Toronto, that is pioneering the use of neuroplasticity to effect change in people.

[2] Idem.

[3] Idem.

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